Fundamental Learning On Water (F.L.O.W.) is a weeklong saltwater canoe trip for 8th graders in RSU1 An early morning on the F.L.O.W. trip for 8th grade students. Jason Gibbons sharing basketball tips with PES students at the open house K/1 circle time Dike-Newell School Smiles
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To support and challenge students to develop and apply the skills, knowledge, and character to be responsible and productive learners, citizens, and leaders in a global society.

<<October 2014>>
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Barbara Gaul, Class of 1970
Posted on 01/29/2014

I was both surprised and flattered when Superintendent Manuel asked me to share my story on the RSU1 site. Following Brian Hatch is going to be a bit tough, but I’ll do my best to uphold the standards.

 

My history with Morse High School is long…my father (Charles Lee) graduated from Morse in 1932. He was Vice President of his class. Both of my brothers graduated from Morse (Craig Lee ’61 and Bruce Lee ’65) and my husband, Allen Gaul graduated in 1967.  My cousin, Brud Stover, formed the Blue & White Golf Classic. Growing up I spent a lot of time attending Morse sports.  One of the most memorable for me was the 1963 New England Basketball Championship game at the Boston Garden when Morse High School played (and lost by two points) against Bangor’s Stearns High School. It was quite a proud moment for Morse High School and this 11 year old girl!

 

I graduated from Morse in 1970. The years that I attended Morse were full of turbulence and change. Not only was the world going through the massive cultural changes of the sixties, the Vietnam War was raging, but also Morse was being renovated. In my senior year the “new wing” opened, with a new library, gymnasium and vocational school classrooms. You might be surprised to learn that there was even a “smoking area”! The dress code still demanded that girls wear skirts or dresses and no one could wear jeans – my how times have changed!

 

I feel very defensive whenever anyone says that Morse does not provide a good education. I had a great education at Morse, very well-rounded.  I had great teachers – and two wonderful female teachers – women who praised me and helped me feel more confident: Martha Huotari (now Mayo) and Edith Doughty.  Mrs. Huotari was an English teacher and Mrs. Doughty taught chorus. I loved being a part of the Mohiba show and chorus events at Morse, which had a very strong creative culture at that time. 

 

Did my education at Morse prepare me for my career? Absolutely. I work at Bath Savings Institution as the Vice President of Marketing. Writing skills are essential to my job. The instruction that I had at Morse in the basics of writing and grammar has been critical to succeeding as a professional. Plus that one typing course that I took in my senior year helped me be a step ahead when personal computers came into the workplace – keyboarding as it is now called was a lot easier for those who could touch type.

 

I am proud to be a Morse High School graduate and I am now a mother of three Morse graduates: Ray Gaul (1990), Shannon Thorne (1993) and Mary Wallace (1997).  I fully expect my five granddaughters to graduate from Morse too!